Monthly Archives: August 2009

New Photo: Wes Editing “Mr. Fox”, Jason Flies a Kite

Director Mark Romanek recently updated his photoblog with a picture of Wes (I assume in London) working on Fantastic Mr. Fox. Mr. and Mrs. Fox seem to be in a cage.

Wes Anderson

Romanek is in London doing post-production on his own film, out in 2010, that will also be distributed by Fox Searchlight. Full size picture here.

via The Playlist

And, apropos of…nothing, here’s a promo video that Jason Schwartzman did for the clothing store Opening Ceremony in which Jason flies a kite, something he’s done before.

Jason Schwartzman: Catalogue Model

With a new TV show premiering in a few weeks, Jason Schwartzman seems to be everywhere in the media, including the pages of a fashion catalogue.

Jason Schwartzman

Schwartzman is included in a series of Polaroids for the label Band of Outsiders (named after Godard’s film of the same name). As you may recall we love polaroids, and these Godard inspired ads are pretty great. Also appearing are Marisa Tomei, Sarah Silverman, Kirsten Dunst and Zooey Deschanel among others. See the rest of Jason’s photographs here.

The photos will appear in Band of Outsiders’ fall 2009 book.

via The Frisky

“Mr. Fox” is Schwartzman’s Favorite Anderson Film

Fantastic Mr. Fox

MTV Movies has a great interview with Jason Schwartzman about Fantastic Mr. Fox, which Jason says is his favorite Anderson film to date. Read the interview after the break.

LOS ANGELES — If there’s one thing we’ve learned from all those “Ocean’s” movies, it’s that George Clooney has a lot of friends. Now the star has united another massive cast including Meryl Streep, Bill Murray, Owen Wilson, Willem Dafoe, Adrien Brody and Jason Schwartzman — although you won’t actually be seeing any of them.

Instead, “The Fantastic Mr. Fox” has even more impressive things to show you. As we can see from the recent trailer, the stop-motion animated film (in theaters November 13) is a unique mix of kiddie-fare breeziness (it’s based on a classic Roald Dahl children’s book), indie-minded filmmaking (“Rushmore” writer/director Wes Anderson is in charge) and star-powered vocal chops. As our weeklong Fall Movie Preview continues, Jason Schwartzman pays us a visit to explain why “Mr. Fox” makes him want to cry.

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‘Mr. Fox’ U.S. Release Date Change

According to Coming Soon, Fox has moved Fantastic Mr. Fox back a week and a half to November 25th, the day before Thanksgiving.

Box Office Mojo, however, lists the 25th as the date of the wide release, with the film opening in New York and Los Angeles on the 13th, and then a limited expansion on the 20th. We’ll keep you informed of any further information.

IFC: Starting Small

From IFC, “Starting Small: Ten Notable Shorts That Became Features.” Among them, Bottle Rocket:

What’s another $4,000 after paying private school tuition? That was probably the pitch made by Wes Anderson and Owen Wilson to their fathers, a year after the two met in a playwriting class at the University of Texas at Austin and decided to pen a script together about a trio of unlikely hoodlums. Similar to the clueless would-be criminals they created — Bob (Robert Musgrave), Anthony (Luke Wilson) and Dignan (Owen Wilson) — Anderson and Wilson scored the initial amount of cash that they asked for from their parents, but only wound up shooting eight minutes of 16mm footage before running out of funds. As a result, the Wilsons’ father contacted family friend and “Paris, Texas” screenwriter L.M. Kit Carson to see if the kids’ work had promise, which led to Carson finding enough money to finance the rest of the 13-minute short, as well as producer Barbara Boyle getting in touch with then-Gracie Films vice president Polly Platt. The short got into Sundance in 1993, and though the unusually rhythmic patter of the characters didn’t make much of an impression on audiences in Park City, it got the attention of Platt’s boss, James L. Brooks, who would ultimately bankroll the feature — which ironically was rejected by Sundance, though there’s no question who got the last laugh.

So What’s Different? Beyond an expansion of the plot, not a whole lot is different except for a jazzier score and that it’s shot in black-and-white.

Film.com’s Top 20 Criterion DVDs

Amanda Mae Meyncke at Film.com has compiled her list of the twenty must-own Criterion Collection DVDs, including films by Francois Truffaut, Noah Baumbach, and Wes Anderson.

 Rushmore, directed by Wes Anderson (1998)
Rushmore is easily the best of Wes Anderson’s films, a carefully crafted vision from one of the best new American directors of the ’90s. A young man named Max Fischer (Jason Schwartzman) finds himself too busy enjoying school to attend to the mundane nature of actually graduating and getting anywhere with his life. Throw in a crush on a teacher and a friendship with a sad sack played by Bill Murray, a host of strange characters and fantastic music, and you’ve got a good look at quirk done right. Nobody other than Cameron Crowe and Quentin Tarantino understands the importance of a good soundtrack quite like Anderson, and Rushmore comes close to perfection in the musical department. Funny, heartwarming and intensely likable, Rushmore is the ideal film.

To read the rest of the list, head on over to Film.com and let us know what you think of their choices.

Paramount Dumps New Schwartzman Film

marc_pease_experience_small

Today The Playlist blog updates on a Jason Schwartzman film we’ve been looking forward to, Todd Luiso’s The Marc Pease Experience.

[The Playlist] talked to Todd Louiso, director of the underrated Phillip Seymour Hoffman drama “Love Liza,” this morning, about his experience with his follow-up film, “The Marc Pease Experience.” The film is unfortunately the latest Paramount Vantage casualty.

Even though the movie stars comic heavyweights Jason Schwartzman and Ben Stiller, as well as talented up-and-coming actress Anna Kendrick, it’s being dumped in ten markets on August 21st. The movie won’t even be playing in New York or Los Angeles.

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