Monthly Archives: January 2010

Wes on J.D. Salinger

From Richard Brody’s blog at the New Yorker:

I remembered this passage from the F. Scott Fitzgerald story “The Freshest Boy”:

He had contributed to the events by which another boy was saved from the army of the bitter, the selfish, the neurasthenic and the unhappy. It isn’t given to us to know those rare moments when people are wide open and the lightest touch can wither or heal. A moment too late and we can never reach them any more in this world. They will not be cured by our most efficacious drugs or slain with our sharpest swords.

—and it occurred to me that more than everything else—more than all the things in his stories that I have been inspired by and imitated and stolen to the best of my abilities—THIS describes my experience of the works of J. D. Salinger.

Wes Accepts NBR Special Achievement Award…In Stop-Motion (video)

Here’s Wes’ acceptance speech as Weasel from Fantastic Mr. Fox at the recent National Board of Review awards ceremony. It is awesome.

After you watch the high quality version above, you can watch a video from the event embedded after the jump to see how it played in the room.

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Fantastic Mr. Fox New York Film Critics Circle Acceptance Speech (video)

Last night Wes accepted the Best Animated Film award for Fantastic Mr. Fox from the New York Film Critics Circle, video of George Clooney’s introduction and Wes’ speech below.


 
If the video goes down, here are two reports on the evening from The New York Times.

Fantastic Mr. Fox is Third Best Reviewed Film of 2009!

The Golden Tomato

The Golden Tomato Awards were announced at Rotten Tomatoes today, and the third best reviewed wide release in the U.S. is none other than Fantastic Mr. Fox. The film is just barely behind the hits Star Trek and Up. Hopefully this will encourage people to see the film. Read the full list of winner at Rotten Tomatoes.

New York Times: Look Out, Pixar, Here Comes ‘Fantastic Mr. Fox’

Let's see some hustle!

In The New York Times today Los Angeles correspondent Brook Barnes takes a look at how Fantastic Mr. Fox is faring in the end-of-the-year awards cycle, and in her estimation it might just have a shot at the top prize.

Full article after the jump.

LOS ANGELES — Figuring out which film will win the Academy Award for best animated feature is usually the easiest part of filling out a ballot for your Oscar pool. Go down the list of nominees — often only three, because so few make the cut — and find the one produced by Pixar. Circle it.

But this year, unexpectedly, animation is becoming a hotly contested race.

The biggest reason is “Fantastic Mr. Fox,” Wes Anderson’s quirky adaptation of the Roald Dahl novel. The film, from 20th Century Fox and the producer Scott Rudin, is soaking up a surprising amount of awards attention.

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A.V. Club’s New Cult Canon: Bottle Rocket

Bottle Rocket

In an on-going series that takes a look at films from the past twenty-five years that have found their audiences in non-traditional routes, the A.V. Club‘s Scott Tobias has taken a look at Wes’ first film, Bottle Rocket.

We did it, though, didn’t we?” —Owen Wilson as Dignan, Bottle Rocket

Back when Fantastic Mr. Fox debuted a few months ago, the following thought occurred to me: “Wes Anderson is forever doomed to make Wes Anderson movies.” Here’s a director who did all he could to step outside his comfort zone, adapting someone else’s work for the first time—in this case, that of Roald Dahl, an author with his own singularity—and using stop-motion animation, a painstaking collaborative process that seems like it should suppress his auteurist instincts. Alas, Fantastic Mr. Fox is a Wes Anderson movie from frame one, because he found a way to square his sensibility with Dahl’s (or, as detractors might put it, “shoehorn it in”) and wrangle a team of animators into bringing his homemade, obsessively detailed Rankin-Bass universe to life. There are two ways to look at it: Anderson is either to be praised for his consistency of vision, or damned for painting himself into a stifling creative corner. This may explain why the maker of such gentle, eccentric, lovingly particular comedies remains one of the more polarizing directors in the business.

Read the full article at the A.V. Club, complete with clips from the film.