Category Archives: Owen Wilson

2013 Lovely Soiree at the Bottle Rocket Motel

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The Reservoir Geeks are again hosting a soiree at the Bottle Rocket motel — on Saturday, July 27 — including the now-traditional Alamo Drafthouse screening of the film.

From the boys:

In 1996, Wes Anderson made his directorial debut with the feature film Bottle Rocket. A large majority of the movie took place at the Windmill Inn in Hillsboro, Texas. Due to the economic downturn the motel’s business suffered, thus the Save The Bottle Rocket Motel event was conceived and became reality in July of 2011. Because Wes Anderson fans tend to be more sentimental than any other fans there was a huge turned out for the event.

Attendees enjoyed Alamo Drafthouse’s showing of the film with none other than Bob Maplethorpe himself, Robert Musgrave in attendance. After the film came to an end, old and newfound friends took to the pool and motel grounds in a late night party full of laughs and libations. When all was said and done the event was a success and the motel was saved. The magic happened once again in July 2012 with the event being fittingly renamed Lovely Soiree at the Bottle Rocket Motel. Fans came from all over the country to partake in the festivities which once again included a showing of Bottle Rocket, courtesy of Alamo Drafthouse Theaters.

This year, on July 27th 2013 throw on you yellow jumpsuit, pop the clutch on your moped and head to Hillsboro, Texas to join us and dozens of fellow film fans for the 2013 Lovely Soiree at the Bottle Rocket Motel and take part in what has become the highlight of the summer (in Hillsboro, Texas… at a motel that was in a movie)!

It is important that you call the motel directly @ 254-582-3493. DO NOT BOOK YOUR ROOM USING THE DAYS INN WEBSITE.

Ralph Fiennes in talks for ‘Grand Budapest Hotel’

With all of the casting confusion the internet is producing, we’re happy to set the record straight and report that both Variety and the Hollywood Reporter (THR) have confirmed Ralph Fiennes is in negotiations for Wes Anderon’s The Grand Budapest Hotel. He’s set to play a character named M. Gustave, who serves as the hotel’s perfectly composed concierge. This role was originally reported to be filled by Johnny Depp, but Wes Anderson denied this two months ago. But Anderson’s frequent cronies Bill Murray, Owen Wilson and Jason Schwartzman are in the cast. Couldn’t imagine an Anderson without them. Fiennes recent projects have been acting alongside Daniel Craig in 007: Skyfall and portraying Charles Dickens in The Invisible Woman.

Also, THR has noted that Murder She Wrote‘s Angela Lansbury is no longer involved with the movie due to commitments to a stage version of the Academy-award winning film Driving Miss Daisy (also a Pulitzer Prize winning play). Lansbury has been performing on stage every year for the past six years. Lansbury will be playing alongside James Earl Jones and will open next year at Her Majesty’s Theater. Tickets will be on sale October 22nd.

The Grand Budapest Hotel is set for release in 2014. Keep checking back at RA.com for more updates.

 

Wes Anderson

The Guardian’s Interview of Wes

The Guardian has a nice interview with Wes regarding his style, his critical reception, working with children, and his frequent collaborators. Regarding the last, he says:

“I don’t think any of us are considered ‘normal’ people,” he says. “It’s probably more a family of crazy uncles. But there’s an energy that comes from people who are friends. Whatever chemistry is on set is going to be there in the movie, and you want some electricity that you don’t really control.”

The rest of the interview can be read over at The Guardian.

Wes and Owen together again?

According to Dallas News movie writer Chris Vognar, Wes Anderson will “reunite” with Owen Wilson for his next film:

Just got off the phone with Wes Anderson, unwinding from the Cannes Film Festival with some friends in Italy. (Tough life). Moonrise Kingdom, his strongest film in years, is set to open June 1 in Dallas. He feels good about it, but acknowledges something (or someone) is missing. That would be Dallas’ Owen Wilson, an Anderson staple as an actor and a co-writer.

“This is the first movie I’ve made that he hasn’t been directly involved with, although he was around as a friend,” says Anderson, above at Cannes, who became good buddies with Wilson at the University of Texas shortly before they made their first feature, Bottle Rocket. “We started out doing this stuff together in the first place. It’s a family dynamic.”

The good news: Anderson’s current script in progress, a large ensemble piece, has a part for his old friend, and Wilson says he’s in.

 

Owen Wilson in Woody Allen’s “Midnight in Paris”

A trailer has appeared for this year’s Woody Allen offering, Midnight in Paris, starring Owen Wilson. We’re glad to see Wilson working with another master after some less than thrilling films. We’ve enjoyed much of Allen’s European work, and this looks splendid. Wilson is joined by Darjeeling co-star Adrien Brody, and a great cast including France’s first lady Carla Bruni.


Midnight in Paris is out in the US on May 20th, through Sony Pictures Classics.

Owen Wilson Interviews Woody Harrelson

Interview Magazine

In the new Interview, Owen Wilson talks to his friend Woody Harrelson about playing poker and his great new film The Messenger. Read the full interview here, or after the break.

Woody Harrelson could so easily have remained the adorable goof behind America’s favorite bar forever. It’s hard to believe now, but for a while playing Woody Boyd on the sitcom Cheers seemed like the summit of Harrelson’s career. (Is there a quicker way for an actor to become typecast than to share a name with a character?) But the Texas-born yearling made quick work of landing choice film roles in Hollywood after the iconic Boston bar shut down operations in 1993. Harrelson went from starring in one of the most violent, experimental, and relentlessly criticized films of the 1990s (Oliver Stone’s Natural Born Killers, 1994) to starring in one of the most violent, experimental, and universally praised films of the 2000s (the Coen brothers’ No Country for Old Men, 2007), with an Oscar-nominated turn as Hustler magazine publisher Larry Flynt (in Milos Forman’s The People vs. Larry Flynt, 1996) in between. The 48-year-old Harrelson has had an unpredictable, brilliantly bipolar career that no one—let alone the actor himself—could have anticipated. Continue reading

Waris: “To India, with Love”

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Waris Ahluwalia, with co-editors Mortimer Singer and Tina Bhojwani, have put together a beautiful and interesting scrapbook called To India with Love: From New York to Mumbai.

Ask people who have been there, and they will all tell you India is like no other place in the world, a land that stirs every one of the five senses and stays in your heart forever. It is this India that brought together three friends, Waris Ahluwalia, Mortimer Singer and Tina Bhojwani to raise funds, spirits, and awareness for the victims of the attacks in Mumbai in November, 2008.  The editors set out to create a scrapbook collecting personal photos, stories, and memories from people who, like themselves, love India. The contributors include Wes Anderson, Adrien Brody, Francesco Clemente, Anthony Edwards, Jeanine Lobell, Natalie Portman, Yves Carcelle, Jean Touitou, Owen Wilson, Laura Wilson, Cynthia Rowley, James Ivory, Matthew Williamson, Rachel Roy, Tory Burch, Padma Lakshmi and Shobhaa De. This book declares to Mumbai and the whole country that we are all thinking of them and support them: hence To India, with Love: New York to Mumbai. Profits from the sales of the book will go to support families affected by the attacks. This book can truly make a difference, by opening eyes to the wonders of India and by once again letting the pen or a camera dominate the sword.

It is featured in the New York Times “The Moment” blog.

Photo by Wes Anderson

IFC: Starting Small

From IFC, “Starting Small: Ten Notable Shorts That Became Features.” Among them, Bottle Rocket:

What’s another $4,000 after paying private school tuition? That was probably the pitch made by Wes Anderson and Owen Wilson to their fathers, a year after the two met in a playwriting class at the University of Texas at Austin and decided to pen a script together about a trio of unlikely hoodlums. Similar to the clueless would-be criminals they created — Bob (Robert Musgrave), Anthony (Luke Wilson) and Dignan (Owen Wilson) — Anderson and Wilson scored the initial amount of cash that they asked for from their parents, but only wound up shooting eight minutes of 16mm footage before running out of funds. As a result, the Wilsons’ father contacted family friend and “Paris, Texas” screenwriter L.M. Kit Carson to see if the kids’ work had promise, which led to Carson finding enough money to finance the rest of the 13-minute short, as well as producer Barbara Boyle getting in touch with then-Gracie Films vice president Polly Platt. The short got into Sundance in 1993, and though the unusually rhythmic patter of the characters didn’t make much of an impression on audiences in Park City, it got the attention of Platt’s boss, James L. Brooks, who would ultimately bankroll the feature — which ironically was rejected by Sundance, though there’s no question who got the last laugh.

So What’s Different? Beyond an expansion of the plot, not a whole lot is different except for a jazzier score and that it’s shot in black-and-white.