A.V. Club’s Pop Pilgrims Visit the Real Rushmore Academy

Yes, this is another post about something fantastic the A.V. Club did, but it was too good not to share. The A.V. Club recently took a field trip to Houston and visited the school that stood in for Rushmore Academy, St. John’s School.

The video features shot-by-shot comparisons of campus then and now, excellent interviews with a current teacher at St. John’s who was a friend of Wes’s in high school and the owner of Rosemary Cross’s home, and, as a bonus, has shot of Wes’s yearbook from senior year.


Houston: The Rushmore School

Join us after the jump for a bit more. Continue reading “A.V. Club’s Pop Pilgrims Visit the Real Rushmore Academy”

How Wes Anderson Soundtracks His Films



If you’ve ever enjoyed Wes Anderson’s keen sense of pairing just the right song with justthe right scene, you have Randall Poster to thank. NPR has a wonderful interview with Poster that focuses on his work with Wes. Poster has worked on all of Wes’s films post-Bottle Rocket, after meeting through a mutual friend.

While walking around a farmer’s market, Anderson told Poster about a piece of music that he wanted to use for Bottle Rocket but couldn’t because of a rights issue.

“I was so smitten with the film that I basically promised to get any piece of music that he ever wanted to use in a movie,” Poster says. “And that kicked us off.”

Randall Poster’s interview with NPR is a real gem and offers a very different perspective of working on an Anderson film. To learn even more about Poster’s work, a 2007 interview with the Guardian has some great blurbs about working on WA films and others.


Image of Poster on the set of The Darjeeling Limited from moviefone.

The Guardian’s Interview of Wes

The Guardian has a nice interview with Wes regarding his style, his critical reception, working with children, and his frequent collaborators. Regarding the last, he says:

“I don’t think any of us are considered ‘normal’ people,” he says. “It’s probably more a family of crazy uncles. But there’s an energy that comes from people who are friends. Whatever chemistry is on set is going to be there in the movie, and you want some electricity that you don’t really control.”

The rest of the interview can be read over at The Guardian.

Adam Yauch’s Criterion Top Ten

We were deeply saddened to learn of the passing of Beastie Boy Adam Yauch. In addition to his massive musical legacy, he was also a daring director and founded Oscilloscope Laboratories, which in our estimation is bar none the best independent film distributor in the world. Yauch was also a passionate movie lover, and he was asked by Criterion to put together a list of his top ten favorite Criterion titles. His list is eclectic and knowledgeable, and it includes two Wes Anderson titles. You can see the list and read his funny, creative reasons (starting with #10 and going up) here.

Death and Dying in the Films of Wes Anderson

From Peter Tonguette’s new series on grief and mourning in film:

When I decided to have a look at Wes Anderson’s films for the first time since my father’s death, I wasn’t sure what to expect. In my mind’s eye, I pictured nothing but the joyous derring-do of Anderson’s protagonists, like Max Fisher leaving a case of bees in Herman Blume’s hotel room or Raleigh St. Clair listening to a private investigator’s report on his wife Margot Tenenbaum’s extramarital activities. As far as I was concerned, these movies represented the same thing Bringing Up Baby did: a happier time, now lost.

Read more at Press Play.  Thanks to Matt Seitz for sending this along.

Edgar Wright Selects “Rushmore” as One of His Top Ten Criterions

British boy wonder Edgar Wright recently participated in Criterion’s on-going sales push/feature wherein they ask folks to list their Top Ten Criterion titles. One of his titles is Rushmore. Here’s why:

This film and the Criterion label are synonymous for me. Its beautiful cover art and immaculate menus seem to fit perfectly with its lead character; it’s almost as if Max Fischer himself were unsatisfied with the original vanilla DVD release from Disney and produced a handcrafted one instead. The actual film is a brilliant gem by Wes Anderson, and one that still shines brightly today. Just in the past year, we’ve seen a number of films that walk in the shadow of this one. Of course, it wouldn’t have inspired so many movies, music videos, commercials, and TV shows if it wasn’t such a distinctive effort.

This is an undeniable cult classic, one that every Max Fischer on the planet has on their shelf.

I love that backstory he created for the new release. I wonder how he’d explain the upcoming Blu-Ray.

Edgar Wright is the awesome director of the awesome films Scott Pilgrim vs. The World, Hot Fuzz, and Shaun of the Dead, as well as the awesome television series Spaced. Read his full Top Ten over at Criterion. Check out Wes’ top ten here, and Bill Hader’s Bottle Rocket loving list here.

Rushmore Director’s Cut Coming to Criterion on Blu-Ray in November!

Criterion announced their November releases this afternoon, and none other than Criterion stand-by Rushmore is coming to Blu-Ray!

The disc will feature everything from the original, stellar, DVD edition, plus a brand new Wes supervised transfer of  his “Director’s Cut.” We’re excited to see it, and hopefully this means we’ll be getting similar upgrades for The Royal Tenenbaums and The Life Aquatic.

Click on the cover above to pre-order from Criterion, the disc will be released November 22nd.

Links for 29 May 2011

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