Tag Archives: Interviews

New York Magazine Interviews Wes, Tells Him About ‘Battleship’

New York Magazine‘s entertainment blog Vulture had a chance to speak with Wes and Cannes, and it’s definitely worth a read. They touch on the new European set film Wes is working on, and there’s a particularly amusing bit regarding the movie Battleship. Read the full interview here, and after the jump.

It’s hard to believe that Wes Anderson is a newcomer to the Cannes Film Festival, since his deadpan verve and Tati-influenced comic tableaus seem tailor-made for fine French sensibilities. Still, better late than never, as Anderson has finally made it to the fest with his latest film Moonrise Kingdom, a starry comedy about two 12-year-olds who fall in love and run away together (with a motley crew of concerned parents and peeved scouting troops in hot pursuit). Vulture sat down with the ivory-suited Anderson on the Croisette today to discuss the making of the movie, the legacy of The Royal Tenenbaums, and the blockbuster movie he’s only just heard of.

It’s unusual to get a movie from you outside of the fall-winter movie season. Are you becoming a summer movie auteur?
[Laughs.] Yes! That’s why it’s my first time at Cannes, actually. I’ve never had the chance to even try to get a movie here before because it’s always been ready at the wrong time. Have you been here many times?

No, this is my first time.
It’s interesting, isn’t it? You really feel they have a way of doing things here. They have a lot of rituals in place here, at least when you present a movie.

How so?
There’s a whole choreography to the opening night, a whole manner of moving, stopping, and turning, and I never knew exactly what was going on. I walked into the theater, I was being led by a cameraman, and as I entered I realized I was being projected onto the screen, gigantically, and then I realized that 2,000 people had been watching me in the auditorium the whole time while I was videoing things with my phone. Anyway!

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Jason Schwartzman on NPR’s Fresh Air

Jason Schwartzman is out promoting the second season of his fantastic HBO series Bored to Death, and today he did a 40 minute interview with Terry Gross for Fresh Air, covering the show and his whole career.

“I gave the script [of Rushmore] to my mom and I said ‘Mom, I’ve never auditioned. Can you give me any pointers? Can you help me memorize lines?’ and she read the script and she said ‘I’ll be right back’ and she went out and rented three films, The Graduate, Dog Day Afternoon, and Harold and Maude. And I watched them all for the first time. And it was in that moment where I felt, watching the films, this warm, insane feeling inside of my body which was a feeling that up until then music had given me. And it was in that moment where I said ‘I don’t know if I’ll ever get this part. I don’t know if my band will ever make it. But I’ve got to try to live my life somehow staying as close to this weird feeling as possible.”

Listen to the interview after the jump, or at Fresh Air‘s site, where you can also download a podcast of the interview.

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Brief Interview with Wes

From the Guardian, full interview after the break.

Portrait of the artist: Wes Anderson, film director
Interview by Laura Barnett

What got you started?

Filming thrillers and jungle chases on Super 8 when I was about 10. I was trying to imitate Raiders of the Lost Ark, Star Wars and, above all, Hitchcock. Watching The Man Who Knew Too Much made me realise that there was such a thing as a director.

What was your big breakthrough?

Making my first proper short, Bottle Rocket, with Owen Wilson on 16mm film when I was 23. Nobody was interested in it except [director and producer] James L Brooks, who picked it up and let us turn it into a full-length movie.

What have you sacrificed for your art?

Well, I’m 40 and I don’t have children yet. I do want to have them: perhaps I already would, if I wasn’t so involved with these movies.

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Olivia Willliams on Rushmore, Twelve Years Later

The A.V. Club recently sat down with Olivia Williams for their great “Random Roles” feature, and one of the films they talked about was, of course, Rushmore.

An except is below, with more after the cut. Read the full article here.

Rushmore (1998)—“Rosemary Cross”

AVC: Wes Anderson was still somewhat of an unknown filmmaker then. What was it like working with him?

OW: I was still in my “do what you’re told” phase, which I’m still pretty well in. It’s served me pretty well. As an actor, you’re just taking temperature. I am anyway, all the time, and responding appropriately. Have you seen Bill Murray’s subsequent film, Lost In Translation? That was what it was like. I was again cast very last-minute and met Wes, this quite physically and socially awkward man who didn’t really talk to me much, a precocious and intelligent young boy. And Bill Murray. And we were sort of left in this bizarre hotel together and taken to strange locations around Houston. That was quite an isolating experience. Again, a lot of fun, but I didn’t really know what was going on. [Laughs.] Bill was incredibly charming and funny and nice, but we were all in a strange vacuum.

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Entertainment Weekly’s Fantastic Mr. Fox Roundtable (video)

Entertainment Weekly‘s Dave Karger sat down for a roundtable discussion with Wes, Meryl Streep, Jason Schwartzman and Bill Murray to talk about Fantastic Mr. Fox. The first part is embedded below, and it continues after the break. Unfortunately you’ll need to use the EW link to see part 3.

And for those who continue to see Mr. Fox over the holiday weekend for the first time (or second…or third) please stop by and leave us your thoughts in the comments or on Twitter.

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The A.V. Club Interviews Wes

Wes Anderson A.V. Club Interview

Scott Tobias of The A.V. Club recently sat down with Wes to discuss working on Mr. Fox (of course) but also talked film. Very good interview, full version after the break.

Now six features into his career, director Wes Anderson has established himself as the most distinctive comedy auteur of his generation, with an instantly recognizable style that’s defined by crispy composed images, idiosyncratic pop soundtracks, and a tone that balances dry wit and deep melancholy. Though his debut feature, 1996’s Bottle Rocket, only drew a small coterie of followers—mostly on video, in the wake of his MTV Movie Award for Best New Filmmaker—Anderson raised his profile enormously with his 1998 follow-up Rushmore, which revived Bill Murray’s critical reputation and influenced a wave of indie films that followed. From there, Anderson and a rotating cast of players have continued to make new variations on his themes of family and outsidership, including 2001’s The Royal Tenenbaums, 2004’s The Life Aquatic With Steve Zissou, and 2007’s The Darjeeling Limited

Though adapted from a Roald Dahl book and shot using the painstaking stop-motion animation process, Anderson’s latest effort, Fantastic Mr. Fox, seems right at home with the rest of his filmography. George Clooney voices the rebellious eponymous character, the head of a Tenenbaum-like family of foxes trying to balance civility with their nature as wild animals. When three mean farmers—Boggis, Bunce, and Bean—try to flush the thieving Mr. Fox from his underground hideaway, he and his cohorts embark on a wild adventure to protect their way of life. Anderson recently spoke to The A.V. Club about meshing Dahl’s voice with his own, directing the animation remotely, and what this film has in common with Where The Wild Things Are.

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