Take a Tour of Moonrise Kingdom with Bob Balaban

Fulfilling his role in Moonrise Kingdom as “Narrator,” the great Bob Balaban takes us inside the island of New Penzance, the (fictional) world of Wes’ latest opus.

 

Parts 2-4 after the jump. Continue reading “Take a Tour of Moonrise Kingdom with Bob Balaban”

On-going coverage of Moonrise Kingdom’s premiere at Cannes


(photo credit: Pop Sugar)

Last updated: 16 May 2012, 2:36 pm ET

Reviews

  • Telegraph (UK)“Moonrise Kingdom (the name Sam and Suzy give their secret hideaway) is a worthy addition to Anderson’s canon – his deadpan wit meshes nicely with a generous view of human imperfections. A mood elevator of a movie, it’s an ideal opener to a sunny, blue-skies Cannes.” 4/5 stars
  • Time Out London – “This is an American story but it has an unmistakeable French flavour to it. The 1960s setting, the kids on the run and the wild plotting (a bit too wild in the final third), all give it a nouvelle vague feel. It’s an American ‘Pierrot le Fou’ refashioned in retrospect with Anna Karina and Jean-Paul Belmondo as pre-teens.” 4/5 stars
  • Hollywood Reporter“Wes Anderson’s Cannes opening-night film is a highly idiosyncratic, impeccable made portrait of young love. A blandly inexpressive title is the worst thing about Moonrise Kingdom, a willfully eccentric pubescent love story in which even the most minute detail has been attended to in the manner of the most obsessive maker of 19th century dollhouses.”
  • Variety“What is childhood if not an island cut off from the grown-up world around it, and what is first love if not a secret cove known only to the two parties caught in its spell? While no less twee than Wes Anderson’s earlier pictures, “Moonrise Kingdom” supplies a poignant metaphor for adolescence itself, in which a universally appealing tale of teenage romance cuts through the smug eccentricity and heightened artificiality with which Anderson has allowed himself to be pigeonholed. A prestigious opening-night slot at Cannes lends luster to Focus’ May 25 release, but not enough to grow his audience.”
  • Film Comment – “Key to its magic is the candlelit production of Britten’s opera about Noah’s ark, Noye’s Fludde, which the town is putting on in the wonderfully named Church of St. Jack. Sam first encounters Suzy there while she is costumed as the raven Noah sends off to find dry land, and the film’s giddy denouement unfolds during an actual storm when the community has taken refuge in the church, which stands in for the ark. Children clad as paired animals—in vivid costumes inspired by Camille Saint-Saëns’s Carnival of the Animals—echo the movie’s emphasis on love, friendship, and imagination. Like The Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra, and like Moonrise Kingdom itself, Noye’s Fludde celebrates beauty in a variety of forms and how it all can come together in a wondrous whole. “
  • IndieWire – “There are diehard Wes Anderson fans and then there’s everyone else. “Moonrise Kingdom,” the idiosyncratic auteur’s seventh feature, eagerly pitches itself toward that first group of audiences and ignores the rest. But those open to Anderson quirks will find a rewarding experience littered with warmth and playful humor.”
  • Film 4 Blog – “It’s doubtful this will win over any outright Anderson sceptics, but as someone who wasn’t sure about a couple of his more recent films, this is an exciting reaffirmation of talent (I’d say it’s his best since Tenenbaums).”
  • Atlantic “He’s still a filmmaker teetering dangerously on the brink of terminal tweeness, but Sam and Suzy bring out Anderson’s sincere side. “Moonrise Kingdom” is about romantic love, but it’s also about love of books, music, nature, and objects—in many regards, a movie that allows Anderson to be himself in a way most of his recent efforts haven’t. It may fade from memory as the festival proceeds, but for now at least, “Moonrise Kingdom” has me reconsidering a filmmaker I had started to write off.”
  • The House Next Door – “Moonrise Kingdom is therefore an unabashed continuation and, what’s more, intensification of the rigorous aesthetic preoccupations and occasionally precious thematic concerns that have long marked Anderson’s films. Since, time and again, adolescent precocity has been his narrative meat and potatoes, he can be given a certain amount of latitude for such indulgences as his obsession with handwritten notes and other kinds of communiqués”
  • Press Play – “Moonrise Kingdom is a great success, both within the context of Wes Anderson’s body of work and as a work unto itself.”
  • Hitfix – “Gilman and Hayward are exquisite as Sam and Suzy, and I like that they don’t look like polished, perfect Disney Channel kids.  They have big personalities that are just starting to come into focus, and they feel like real kids, struggling with the disappointments that are inherent to the maturation process.”
  • Little White Lies – “Yet with Moonrise Kingdom, Anderson has made a film about youth that feels like it was ripped from the overactive imagination of a 12-year-old. It’s like a Prairie Home Companion version of Romeo and Juliet as made by a raffish aesthete. But the biggest coup here is that Anderson has finally managed to anchor his trademark whimsy with a sincere and heady romanticism, and by the end, you may even be reaching for your immaculately embroidered handkerchief (or neck scarf) to wipe away the tears.”
  • Thompson on Hollywood – “It’s fun watching Anderson manipulate this superb cast, who deliver delicious, precisely scripted comic moments surrounded by such archaic 1965 props as walkie-talkies, megaphones and person-to-person split screen phone calls.”

 

Slate’s Interview with Wes Anderson

Jacob Weisberg sat down with Wes for an extended interview to discuss his auteur style, his commercials as mini-movies, stop-motion animation, and the pleasures of working with Bill Murray, along with answering Slate reader questions for the Conversations with Slate series. Two installments have been released so far, with others to be added as the week goes on (and TRA will be there to update this post!)

Here is the first installment, in which he discusses the casting of the adolescent leads, his childhood experiences, and his love-affair with Francois Truffaut:

See the second installment after the jump. Continue reading “Slate’s Interview with Wes Anderson”

AV Club Picks Moonrise Kingdom as One of Summer’s Most Anticipated Films

It says it all in the title, I quote them:

What to expect: The latest Wes Anderson film abandons all pretense that that the writer-director might one day move on from Close ’N Play record players and transistor radios, and instead returns to Anderson’s motherland of the 1960s for a story about a boy scout and his girlfriend disappearing into the wilderness and alarming their New England island community. Bruce Willis, Edward Norton, Frances McDormand, and Tilda Swinton join Anderson regulars Bill Murray and Jason Schwartzman to tell the tale.
Practical advice: Anderson is nothing if not a fetishist for plans and diagrams, so there’s a good chance that he and co-writer Roman Coppola will offer real tips on how to survive in the wild.
Cause for irrational alarm: On the other hand, those tips will likely involve foodstuffs and gadgetry that are no longer being manufactured, and will require you to wear an easily identifiable article of clothing and walk in slow motion as a wispy old pop song plays. In other words: You might be stuck in the woods for a while

Read the full (baby manual inspired) list, assembled with the AV Club’s signature dash of droll wit, aqui.

Moonrise Kingdom set footage and interviews.

For all you Wes Anderson fans that can’t hold back your excitement for Moonrise Kingdom, here are four behind the scenes (b-roll) videos from the set that we know you’ll enjoy. Also, cast interviews with Edward Norton, Bruce Willis, Tilda Swinton and Bill Murray.

Part: I

See a ton more after the jump.

Continue reading “Moonrise Kingdom set footage and interviews.”

Moonrise Kingdom Soundtrack – Spotify Playlist

While we anxiously await the Moonrise Kingdom soundtrack release on May 22, we’ve created this Spotify playlist with all of the available tracks to hold you over.

Enjoy:  Songs From Wes Anderson’s Moonrise Kingdom Soundtrack

Moonrise Kingdom Poster

The poster for Wes’ new film has arrived (via IMP Awards), click on the thumbnail above to view it full size.

It appears to be entirely painted, including the two young stars of the film. The poster features that same custom font designed by Jessica Hische, and as soon as we know who created the poster art we’ll let you know. What do you think? Best poster ever, man?

Update (03/08)

Thanks to commenter Filmkid for informing us the art was done by British painter Michael Gaskell. You can see some of his other work here. No thunderstorm paintings, alas.

Moonrise Kingdom Trailer!

See it in HD at Apple.

 

The film will open on May 25th through Focus Features. Let us know what you think in the comments or in our Yankee Racers thread!