Tag Archives: The Royal Tenenbaums

The Royal Tenenbaums 10th Anniversary Screening at NYFF

The 49th Annual New York Film Festival will be taking place next month, and they’ve announced a ten-year anniversary screening of Wes’ masterpiece The Royal Tenenbaums. The screening will take place October 13th, and will be followed by a Q&A with Wes and cast members from the film. The film of course had its world premiere at the festival in 2001. More info about the festival and the screening can be found at their website.

(via The Playlist)

Tribute Posters Out of Toronto

Toronto-based artist & designer Ibraheem Youssef has created some gorgeous, clever movie poster redesigns for Wes Anderson films, as well Tarantino films. Youssef produces concise illustrations that fall somewhere between elegant and raw.

IbraheemYoussefPosters

The first wave of these redesigns has earned a lot of attention around the internet. We here at Rushmore Academy have also taken note, and an exclusive Rushmore//Youssef surprise is in the works. It’s a cliffhanger, so keep checking back for more details.

In the meantime, you can purchase the released-as-yet posters in 2 sizes at Ibraheem Youssef’s shop.

Matt Zoller Seitz and the Directors of the Decade: Wes Anderson

Wes Anderson

Over at SalonMatt Zoller Seitz (freelance critic, and author of one the earliest and best profiles of Wes, and this incredible series of video essays from earlier this year) has been taking a look at some of the most influential directors of the decade in an on-going series of essays. Seitz’s latest examines the work of Robert Zemeckis and Wes Anderson.

An excerpt:

That’s where Wes Anderson comes in. The director of “The Royal Tenenbaums” (2001), “The Life Aquatic With Steve Zissou” (2004), “The Darjeeling Limited” (2007) and this year’s Roald Dahl adaptation “Fantastic Mr. Fox” is as much a train-set filmmaker as Zemeckis, Jackson and Lucas, and like Fincher, Paul Thomas Anderson (“Punch-Drunk Love,” “There Will Be Blood”), Zemeckis and Spielberg, he’s one of the few prominent Hollywood filmmakers working in the ’70s auteur tradition — and doing it with a style so distinct that it can never be stolen, only imitated. He’s notorious for fretting over every aspect of his movies, from the texture of the clothes to the precise geometric motion of each shot and camera movement to the choice of on-screen font (he prefers variations of Futura). Detractors describe his style as fussy, overcomplicated, even airless — and if one prefers a messier, more spontaneous kind of filmmaking, or a more “invisible” style of direction, Anderson is almost certainly the opposite of fun.

I won’t mount a defense of Anderson as an exciting, imaginative and important filmmaker in this article, because I’ve already done it in a series of video essays.I mention him in this piece because of two particular aspects of his art. One is his commitment to analog moviemaking. He shoots on film and prefers to do everything, special effects included, on the set rather than create them after the fact. Even when he employs digital effects or processes, he calls attention to their artificiality; think of the obviously stop-motion sea creatures in “Aquatic” — or, for that matter, the unruly, roiling fur on the creatures in “Fantastic Mr. Fox” — which the director insisted be fabricated with hard-to-manage animal hair rather than more controllable synthetic hair, because he just liked how it looked.

Be sure to read the full piece at Salon, and leave your comments below. It’s a great essay, and well worth the read.

Archives: The New York Times Watches a Movie With Wes

WATCHING MOVIES WITH: Wes Anderson; From Centimes, A Wealth Of Ideas
By RICK LYMAN
Published: Friday, January 11, 2002

”WHY did I pick this movie?” Wes Anderson asked himself, slouching against the wall in the glass-lined lobby of an office building on the Paramount Pictures lot, a sultry black-and-white portrait of Dorothy Lamour peering over his shoulder. ”I don’t actually have an answer for that.”

Mr. Anderson, it turns out, is the sort of person who tells you — a little sheepishly — that he has no answer to something, and then spends the next two and a half hours giving you one.

A slanted, self-deprecating smile spread across his face. Tall, bony and professorial, he leaned his forehead down so that he had to tilt his eyes up a bit to look straight ahead. ”One thing is, I’m a big François Truffaut fan and this is the most unpretentious movie that I can possibly imagine,” said Mr. Anderson, 32.

Continue reading

“Being Bill Murray” T-Shirt

The good people at /Film have posted another Bill Murray inspired piece of art, this time a t-shirt by artist Paul O’Sullivan called “Being Bill Murray.” This isn’t the first time Murray’s diverse career has inspired an artist.

The shirt includes three of the four characters Murray has played for Wes Anderson (from left to right): Raleigh St. Clair (The Royal Tenenbaums), Herman Blume (Rushmore), and Steve Zissou (The Life Aquatic with…). No spot for The Businessman from The Darjeeling Limited? What’s the deal? ;)

You can click the picture below to see a bigger version and order one for yourself. (That is, if you’re either a small or an x-large. All other sizes are unfortunately out of stock.)

Murray can currently be seen in his third film with director Jim Jarmusch The Limits of Control which is in limited release and will be expanding throughout the month.

Fantastically Flawed Fathers

Kim Morgan wrote an intriguing piece for the Huffington Post on Father’s Day examining “five fantastically flawed fathers” from film. These include Nicholas Cage in Raising Arizona, Ryan O’Neal in Paper Moon, and of course Gene Hackman in The Royal Tenenbaums.

Wes Anderson taps into that childhood yearning we have for our past, how it’s as rose colored as Royal’s dress shirts but at the same time, lonely, bitter and neglected. Anderson makes something beautiful about all this, without being sloppy and we come to not only adore Royal but trust his advice.

Don’t forget to steal the grandkids and hop a dump truck to show your family love sometime soon!

Marc Jacobs “most influenced” by The Royal Tenenbaums

Paris fashion week is in full swing and Marc Jacobs, as usual, has been impressing the critics. We of course know that Marc Jacobs (creative director for Louis Vuitton) had a close working relationship with Wes Anderson on The Darjeeling Limited with the creating of the spectacular luggage and suits used by Francis and his brothers. But in the Guardian piece it seems that the film that “most influences” Jacobs his The Royal Tenenbaums:

Louis Vuitton only started making clothes 10 years ago under the aegis of Marc Jacobs, almost 150 years after the label first knocked out the ubiquitous bags. But its fashion division has become a credible player and last year the label achieved record growth. As if to rub in the American-ness, Jacobs has said that the film that influences him most is not Breakfast at Tiffany’s but The Royal Tenenbaums, Wes Anderson’s offbeat film about a dysfunctional family.

Anderson was also in attendance at this show (as was Sofia Coppola and many others).