“Aspects of It Seem Slightly Fake,” and Chatter about TDL

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Ed Hardy, Jr. has posted another essay in his series on Wes Anderson, titled “Aspects of It Seem Slightly Fake.”

Some more reviews of The Darjeeling Limited with snippets by Yankee Racer “leeroy”:

  • Ain’t It Cool: “Well, not only did I like the film, but I am here to tell you that it is simply the most entertaining thing I have seen in my time here in Venice. The movie had me laughing out loud more than once. The cinematography is great with the use of color to underline anything that is going on. And the acting is superb. . . I can’t recommend it highly enough.”
  • Telegragh (U.K.): “Director Wes Anderson’s films (Rushmore, The Royal Tenenbaums) share a languid, calculatedly offbeat charm, but their characters often seem to belong to a cool, tight little clique, with an array of private in-jokes. Audiences can easily feel excluded. All this is true of Anderson’s new film The Darjeeling Limited: happily, its charm trumps its shortcomings.There’ s a genuinely sweet-natured feel to The Darjeeling Limited that makes this screwed-up trio engaging rather than irritating.” – David Gritten
  • Financial Times (U.K.): “The jokes are good, the saffron-filtered visuals even better” – Nigel Andrews
  • Guardian Unlimited (U.K.): “It’s a sensuous experience, gorgeous to look at and gently comic but, as it touches on family bonding, heirlooms and hereditary traits, it develops a delicately moving mood. One to savour when it closes the London Film Festival in November.” – Jason Solomons

Quoting the web

David Poland wonders:

Is The Darjeeling Limited Fox Searchlight’s secret weapon of 2007 or just a happy Wes Anderson comedy? (link)

Jake Coyle, writing for the AP, argues that the last decade of film has been far better than the AFI Top 100 suggests:

According to the American Film Institute’s new list of the 100 greatest films, the last 10 years have produced only four great ones: “Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring” (No. 50), “Saving Private Ryan” (No. 71), “Titanic” (No. 83) and “The Sixth Sense” (No. 89).

I get bloated just typing those titles. Granted, the last 10 years have been a historically weak period for films. They can’t touch Hollywood’s golden era of the ’40s, or the heralded ’70s, when maverick directors roamed the studios.

But surely, there’s been more to see in the last decade than Haley Joel Osment whispering “I see dead people.” (Pssst: I’ve seen better movies.)…

Wes Anderson’s classically quirky comedy “Rushmore” is far more than a cult flick. In a long comic lineage of oddballs, Max Fischer (Jason Schwartzman) tops them all.

Many others that weren’t on the ballot are also deserving. Two that could sit comfortably on the shelf next to “Rushmore” are “Election” and the Coen brothers'”The Big Lebowski.” The latter rises to the level of classic — after all, its whole premise is film noir held up to the funhouse mirror of “The Dude.” (link)

Jeffrey Wells dished up some harsh criticism of Wes in relation to his sometimes-collaborator Noah Baumbach. You can read it here, if you’d like. I would like to hear your comments over on the message board.

Henry Selick at the Platform International Animation Festival

574 Henry Selick, the fantastic animation artist, will be appearing at the Platform International Animation Festival in Portland, Oregon.

An Afternoon with Henry Selick
Saturday, 30 June
2.00-3.30 pm
Newmark Theatre (Portland, Oregon)

Mr. Selick worked with Wes on The Life Aquatic. He was scheduled to work with Wes on The Fantastic Mr. Fox, though some sources have cast doubt on this collaboration. His current project is called Coraline. If anyone plans to attend, please report any Wes related news to webmaster@rushmoreacademy.com.

URL: festival website

Wes/Bob Yeoman as one of the ‘Great Cinematographer-Director Relationships’ & a tidbit on Robyn Cohen

A really interesting article at Daily Film Dose (a great site, by the way) lists the Anderson-Yeoman collaboration as one of the ‘great cinematographer-director relationships’:

Yeoman and Anderson’s films are so distinct, one frame of one of their films is immediately distinguishable as their own. They love their wideangle, anamorphic frames, extremely overcranked slo-mo and lush saturated colours. Look for “The Darjeeling Limited” hopefully later this year.

URL: the article at Daily Film Dose

One other tidbit…

Robyn Cohen (The Life Aquatic) is the star of a new direct-to-Internet feature length film, called Zzyzx (Zi-zux). The concept is interesting (I haven’t checked out the film yet, though. Post your comments if you have.).

URL: Story about the film in the Sun Chronicle
URL: Film site

Bud Cort interview

bucort.jpg

Wes is completely different from all of them. I never worked with Fellini but I almost did. Wes is his own planet but I see a little Fellini streak there. After the film was reviewed it was like when cubism came on the heels on impressionism and people went insane. Wes is a cubist with classical netting. – Bud Cort

A pretty interesting interview with one of our favorites, Bud Cort from The Life Aquatic and Harold and Maude (please note that this interview transpired two years ago but has only now been published).

Backyardigans do the Life Aquatic?

With not much in terms of news to post, this post from the message board is quite amusing. This Nick Jr. Backyardigans counting activity book looks suspiciously like Team Zissou:

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“The Life Examined with Wes Anderson” {archive}

New York Magazine, December 20, 2004

What did the idiosyncratic director do with his first full-size budget? He put Bill Murray into a father-figure role, and gave him a speargun.

Wes Anderson’s The Life Aquatic With Steve Zissou looks, at first, as though it’s the inevitable final entry in what you might call Anderson’s Great-Search-for-a-Father-Figure Trilogy. It’s of a piece with previous Anderson movies like Rushmore (1998) and The Royal Tenenbaums (2001), in that it features a selfish bastard (Bill Murray in the first; Gene Hackman in the second) who, in crumbling middle age, decides it’s important to impart some of his wisdom, or at least his hard-won cynical savvy, to a young man who views him as a father figure, if not an actual father. What’s with the dad thing, Wes?

Continue reading ““The Life Examined with Wes Anderson” {archive}”